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martha brook blog post how to make a Christmas wreath
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How to make a Christmas wreath with Bloom & Wild

Published 2 months ago. Estimated reading time: 4 minutes.

Dec 15

Between hunting for gifts, decking the halls and catching up with those closest to us, Christmas can feel pretty full-on, right?! But we can always find the time for fun festive activities! So if you’re looking for a cosy Christmassy day inside, our friends at Bloom & Wild are here to help with these easy steps for how to make a Christmas wreath…

If you’re looking for tips on how to make a Christmas wreath at home, all you’ll need is to gather your own foliage and adornments. Or if you’d like everything in one handy package, Bloom & Wild’s Christmas DIY Wreath has everything you need to make your front door festive!

“To achieve a professional-looking wreath, you will need a pair of scissors, floristry reel or binding wire, a wire or vine wreath ring, some ribbon or twine to hang it, and for a fuller look, you can add Sphagnum moss if you want. You’ll be able to find these tools at your local garden centre or florist.” Caroline Grimble, floral stylist at Bloom & Wild

How to make a Christmas wreath

Step 1: Gather fresh foliage and adornments

martha brook blog post how to make a Christmas wreath

The first step with how to make your own Christmas wreath is to gather foliage! Whether that’s bits you have already in the house or you fancy a forage.

Foliage: Holly, Ivy, Eucalyptus, Rosemary, Pine

Adornments: Pinecones, Ruscus, Dried oranges, Canella berries, Poppy seed heads, Baby’s breath, Limonium, Mistletoe

…or recycle your flowers! Caroline says, “dried wreaths are the perfect way to give new life to cut flowers. You can dry the flowers and foliage from a dying bouquet, the easiest way is to hang them upside down in a dark and dry storage room.”

Dried flowers can also add a nice touch to wreaths, but do handle with care as they’re delicate so they’re great to fill any gaps.

Step 2: Prepare your foliage

 martha brook blog post how to make a Christmas wreath

Cut the foliage stems, keeping them about 8-15 cm long. Lay them in groups of 2 to 3 stems, staggering down, so the tips lay slightly below each other.

Step 3: Prep your wreath ring

If you decide to add some moss or other soft foliage, start by wrapping it tightly with the wire around your wreath ring, leaving gaps of about 4 cm between each loop. Cut the wire and twist the ends together when you’ve made a full circle.

Step 4: Start making

martha brook blog post how to make a Christmas wreath

With your chosen foliage stems, gather little bunches of foliage together, snipping the foliage down to lengths of between approximately 15 to 20 cm. Feed the wire through the frame and secure. Then lie your first bunch of foliage on the mossed or vine ring and wrap the wire tightly around the bunch and frame. Make up another foliage bunch and lay it so it covers the stems of the previous bunch, wire over the stems as before. Work down in a zigzag formation so you have full coverage.

Step 5: Add the final details

The best part! This is the fun bit, adding any adornments or dried flowers you might have. These can just be inserted into the moss or vine ring and are perfect for brightening up and filling in any gaps in the composition. 

martha brook blog post how to make a Christmas wreath

Next, add your hanging ribbon or twine. A thin ribbon looks best when attached to the frame at the back, while a larger one can be wrapped around the top of your wreath and secured with an oversized bow. Both ribbon options are excellent choices, with the thin one letting your foliage and flower do the talking and the large one adding a clear focal point to the wreath.

Thank you so much to Bloom & Wild for this brilliant guide!

P.S. Tight on time, or sounds like too much fuss? See Bloom & Wild’s range of ready-made or DIY wreaths, and discover the rest of their Christmas Range.

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